Software on my MacBook Pro, Part 2

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Even though I've been using a Mac on-and-off for quite a few years, my experience really using it has really only recently begun. I recently wrote about some of the applications I'm using and wanted to share some more of them.

Not even a third-party application, something I've been a little surprised that I use so much is the DigitalColor Meter. I use it to get the hex value of colors, which is faster than taking a screenshot and opening it in Photoshop to read the color value. Very handy!

One of the features I really like in Leopard is QuickLook. I'm still trying to get used to the motion of hitting space rather than just opening something, but I really like how fast and easy it is. Unfortunately QuickLook doesn't know how to usefully display all file types, so I've found a few plugins that have helped: Folder, Archive, and QLColorCode. QuickLook Plugins List tracks the plugins that are available.

Something I would always do on a Windows machine was to change file associations so that different file types would always open with the application I wanted to use, and not the default the system used. There's likely some command line-magic that can be used to change this on OS X, but I'm quite surprised there's no pretty interface for it. RCDefaultApp to the rescue!

Snapz Pro X gives a great deal of control when taking screenshots. In fact, I typically don't even need an image editor when working with screenshots. Snapz Pro X will let me do screencasts, too, though I haven't had need of that feature yet.

Part 3, to come!

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Hello:

Per your comment re: ""Something I would always do on a Windows machine was to change file associations so that different file types would always open with the application I wanted to use, and not the default the system used. There�s likely some command line-magic that can be used to change this on OS X, but I�m quite surprised there�s no pretty interface for it.""

Actually, there is. You can change file/app associations very easily via the 'Get Info' command's dialog box. I'm mostly certain you've found this out, but if not, email me and I'll send simple directions and screen shots.

Hope things are going well.

Scott

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